Tag Archive | combining prints

Vintage ’40s in Blue and Red

Although this dress is obviously influenced by years past, Bunny Bear Patterns describes her design, “Soda Pop,” as vintage 1940s.  I’m no expert, but I see this more like the 1950s or even the 1960s. The clothes from all these years make me happy, so I guess the point is moot. Here is the dress:

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The bodice fit is this pattern’s best feature. I love the darts in the front and back; few doll clothes patterns include darts. This pattern has no neck facing; it is impossible for me to make my work neat without a facing, or better yet, without a lining for the bodice. I lined the bodice and hand-stitched the hem of the cap sleeve and the lining for it.

For some reason, white collars have almost become a trademark of my doll dresses. I often spend time perusing fabric stores for white print on white so that I can easily mix the white collar or white blouse with a bolder print. This closeup view features this collar in all its glory. Hopefully, you can see the white design on the white background that is machine embroidered. I was a bit nervous about getting this collar even. A mistake is always more obvious with a white collar against a darker colored dress. This collar is just about perfect.

Here are some thoughts about sewing collars, lapels, pockets, ties, or any shape that is sewn together and turned right-side out. This is a bamboo point turner like the one I’ve used for several years. When I started sewing with more delicate fabrics, I added more point turners to my sewing tools. Amazon has a variety of them. In the past, I was so hung up about getting my collars or other items perfectly pointed that I’d accidentally stretch the fabric while trying to shape the corner. I’m learning to hold back. This particular collar was a challenge because the embroidered fabric added bulk to the seam. I trimmed the seam very close to the point before turning the collar. Then I was careful when I turned the collar. My “point” is “round” at the end, but it looks pointed from a distance.

point turner

This pattern suggests using 1/4-inch ribbon. I couldn’t grasp the idea of sewing two rows of stitch on delicate ribbon so I used 1/4-inch double-folded red bias tape. I’m getting pretty good at sewing on bias tape. In case you didn’t know, one side of double-folded bias tape is slightly wider than the other side.

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If you sew on the narrow side, you will be certain to catch both sides without falling off the under side edge. Further more, if you try different presser feet, you can find one that makes sewing very close to the edge easy. I didn’t go off track once with this sewing project. My stitching is not perfect, but it is close to it.

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I’d planned to attach two bows to this finished dress, as the pattern suggests. I’d purchased ribbon that matched the bias tape thinking the similar colors would fool the eye. But I realized that my ribbon was 3/8-inch wide, 1/8-inch too wide. It didn’t look right. I decided to fall back on my favorite rose that I learned to make with McCall’s 6875.

This dress is unequivocally one of my favorite projects EVER. I give the pattern designer much credit for this sweet dress. However, I think the pattern requires lots of experience because the photos aren’t as clear as they could be. I can usually get by relying on the instructions, but I’ve sewn many dresses and only need guidance on the details. I think the pattern would be better if the bodice were lined, like I lined mine. The neck should at least have a facing. Otherwise, there’s just a small clipped 1/4-inch seam on the other side of the neckline.

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You might be able to see how straight my stitching is in the photo above, especially with the red thread on the white lining. I’m not bragging about my talent; I’m showing you a skill I have learned, not based on talent; it’s based on trial and error and figuring out what to focus on in order to sew in a straight line. In this case, the edge of my presser foot lined up close to the edge of the bias tape. I still have trouble controlling the presser foot when I’m sewing over something too thick for the feed dog to work properly. In that case, I’m liable to go off the edge or get stuck.

A little word about using Velcro. I’ve tried pinning it on, and/or basting it, but pushing straight pins through the Velcro and the layers of the garment is difficult, even risky. I’d always stab myself. Now, I use one straight pin for general placement only, and then I hold the strip of Velcro in place with my fingers as I stitch it. I start sewing somewhere in the middle of the long side of the strip, instead of the end; this way the Velcro doesn’t shift out-of-place while I’m stitching over the bumpy beginning of the strip.

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soda pop clip art

Separates with Two Polka Dot “Looks”

I decided to make separates for a change when I came across this cute top pattern called Summer Breeze by Doll Tag Clothing.  The instructions give several ways to finish the front panels. Since I prefer to have the inside of my garments tidy, I opted to line the front. In addition, I lined the back, but I still used the provided neck facings. I was able to tack the neck facings down to the inside lining without leaving visible tacks near the outside neckline.

I wish that this pattern included armhole facings, instead of instructions to hem a curved armhole. Hemmed armholes are not a good look for me. I picture myself re-doing the narrow hem several times before I’m happy with it. My handmade polka dot bias tape solved this problem, but the armholes turned out a bit tight. Next time I sew with this pattern, I will make little armhole facings, or I will trim the armholes 1/4 inch before adding the bias tape.

Summer Breeze Top with Shorts and Emma Bag in Pinstripe

I adore these coordinated shorts that I made with my own generic pattern. I generally put a waistband in front and a casing with elastic in the back. The pink cuffs on the shorts were simple. I sewed a rectangular piece of solid pink fabric to the wrong side of each shorts leg and folded the hem over onto the right side and top-stitched the solid piece.

This pinstriped “Emma Bag” with an adorable gathered pocket was easy to make using a pattern by Bonjour Teaspoon. I look forward to making this bag out of various prints (like the one below out of pink polka dots). I appreciate coordinated clothing but not too matchy-matchy. The pink bag would have been too much for the outfit above. But with the gray dotted Swiss pants below, the pink bag is perfect.

Summer Breeze Top with Pants and Emma Bag in Pink Polkadots

I use a lot of dotted swiss. Some of it is better quality than the rest; some of it loses its shape. This gray dotted Swiss unravels a lot, but it combined well with the pink and gray polka dots and the pink and white polka dot bag.

I’m not sure why, but I rarely make separates. Give me a vintage dress to sew anytime. But I was intrigued by this Summer Breeze top pattern. Its clean shape is versatile with the shorts and long pants. I should probably add a little skirt. I love these smart pink clogs, and my models tend to wear this fabulous bracelet by 2SistersSewCrafty.

Clockwise Beginning on Top with Pinstripe Bag, Pink Polkadot Bag, Shorts with Pink Cuff, Summer Breeze Top, and Gray Dotted Swiss Pants

Each separate shares the above photo. The Summer Breeze Top has a back closure with a white slim strip of Velcro. You may see a glimpse of the polka dot bias tape around the armhole. The bag was easy to make, using the pink polka dot cotton. But the striped seersucker is another matter. The fabric unravels like crazy and must be handled with care.

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tulips in pot

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Play Dress in Seasonal Colors

It is common for me to alter an existing pattern and change it all together. In this case, I had a “look” in mind and I went through my patterns until I found something I could use. I begin here with Simplicity 1485. Knit fabric is recommended for View F, but I use woven fabric of cotton. I specifically want a play dress with a seam that is higher than an empire waist.

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Because I didn’t use a knit, I can’t just hem the neckline, so I face it with a red bodice lining. View F has a simple short raglan sleeve which makes the doll’s shoulders look nice and wide, but I wanted long sleeves. After cutting out long polka dot sleeves, I place the hemmed shorter sleeves (that match the bodice) on top of the polka dot ones and attach them along the hemline. Then I sew both layers of sleeves to the bodice with right sides together.

The skirt is gathered with two additional strips added to the bottom, instead of the one strip in View F. The challenge is making the inside look neat and professional.

See View F in bottom row.

See View F in bottom row.

The most fun I had putting this dress together was choosing the fabric. I ordered the plaid fabric from Low Price Fabric online. It was originally meant for Christmas. It looked green and red in the photo, and I was disappointed until I found this fat quarter for the bodice at In Between Stitches in downtown Livermore.

I like to have plenty of small polka dot fabric on hand. I originally purchased this red and white fabric for doll bloomers and slips with lace at the hem. This fabric was a couple of dollars a yard at Wal-Mart, the only store that has fabric in my town! Boo-hoo. I seem to keep my fabric room well-stocked without a fabric store nearby. Here’s another view of our model Saige wearing the dress.

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My plan was to get started early on Christmas outfits for my dolls. I keep forgetting that Thanksgiving is still ahead. Because the plaid fabric looks gold and red, instead of green and red, this dress can easily be worn to Thanksgiving dinner.

As I’ve previously mentioned, the Velcro for the back closure can easily catch on serger stitches, so I’ve been compromising when I use Velcro. In this case I serged the bottom seams. But to avoid the Velcro issue, I hand-stitched the edge of the skirt closure.

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I love this color combo. You can look forward to seeing more of my brilliant holiday color combos in the near future.

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thanksgiving-snoopy8

Pink on Pink Ruffled Dress

I love this colorful dress, but while sewing it, I realized that I don’t enjoy gathering skirts that much. I will continue to make skirts that are gathered but this one has two rows of gathers, one on top of the other.

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For this reason, this dress was a challenge that required much patience. I tried to line up both tiers and gather them together, but—as you may guess—the ruffles lost their personality when lined up together. On the other hand, as careful as I was, after I’d attached the top ruffle to the bodice, I noticed that the bottom ruffle had unraveled away from the body (bodice), and there was no quick fix. I had to take everything apart and regather both tiers.

This pattern by Eden Ava Couture is influenced by vintage 1930s fashion. However, once I cut out the dress, I decided to use a different collar. I took the removable collar from a different Eden Ava Couture dress that I previously made, added it to this dress and sewed three buttons to the color.

I also trimmed the bottom of the drop-waisted bodice; I didn’t like the way it was cut. Let me say that I like the style of Eden Ava Couture patterns, and I admire anyone who is brave enough to create a pattern and offer it for sale. It’s like publishing a book. Credit goes to those who do. So far, my patterns are not ready for sale, so I don’t want to slam Eden Ava. You can go to Pixie Fair patterns and find other Eden Ava patterns and judge for yourself. I love the Vintage Silhouette Dress with the removable collar.

Here’s another look at this dress with a hat.

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I added the same hat that I often make. I can practically make this while I’m blindfolded.

Don’t you think these pink clogs are cute? They have a little push-in button that hooks the back strap to the shoe, making it easy to get dressed.

I always line my doll clothes whenever possible. Here’s a view of the inside of this dress and the Velcro fastener on the back.

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I think that this 1/2-inch double-folded bias tape on the edge of each ruffle creates a nice effect. In this case, I was able to use some printed (pink checked) bias tape that I found in my personal collection of ribbon and tape.

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DO_Swirly Stem3

Vintage in Lavender

My original plan was to make doll clothes that mimic current fashion for little girls. I had little interest in old-fashioned dresses that (to me) look like prairie dresses. I’d wanted to focus on separates, and I especially wanted my doll clothes to be chic and trendy.

I have discovered that some current fashion does not suit an 18-inch doll’s body because American Girl and Madame Alexander have a shape that is boxy. I’ve always preferred these dolls over “Barbie” probably because I was just outgrowing (phase one of) my dolls when Barbie arrived upon the scene. I want a flat chest on my doll. I prefer a boyish figure for my doll.

I have found one characteristic of the 18-inch doll that creates a challenge for dressing her. This doll has a chunky/boxy back from the waist to the butt. She has no small of the back. Pants and skirts and clothes that reveal this boxy shape aren’t that fun for me to make. This is one reason that I prefer making dresses for American Girl.

Also, I love vintage clothes, particularly from the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. The follow is a Heritage Doll Fashion that is sold by Pixie Faire.

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As much as I like this dress pattern, the polka dot trims don’t stand out as much as I would like because the floral fabric is busy. Yet this same floral fabric warms my heart; it reminds me of a house dress my mother wore when I was a child. Here’s another view of the dress that shows a slightly better view of the waist placket.

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This dress pattern is fairly straight-forward to follow. The biggest challenge is getting all the seams the same size (1/4 inch) so that the collar, sleeve cuffs, pocket trim, and plackets look perfectly even. I did not choose to use the front placket or the tied bow in the back of the dress.

I did not follow the directions for the side plackets or the pocket trims. I chose my method. Instead of pressing a 1/4-inch hem on every side of the placket, I cut two plackets (four all together) and sewed them right sides together, leaving a small opening so that I could turn the plackets right side out and press. My method is more accurate and neater (and therefore easier).

I enjoyed using this Heritage pattern. I also made another Heritage pattern that I call Vintage Blue and Beige.

I’m using my favorite doll jeweler called 2SistersSewCrafty at Etsy.

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flower with fairy